Please note that all General Education (GenEd) courses listed below are 3 credits each.

The numbers in parenthesis indicate the quadrant for GenEd course cluster formation.  Courses from the same quadrant form clusters that satisfy the GenEd breadth requirement.  

  • Arts & Humanities (AH) – Quadrants 1, 2, 3
  • Social Sciences (SS) – Quadrants 4, 5, 6
  • Quantitative Sciences (QS) – Quadrants 7, 8, 9

BUS 102 Introduction to Personal Finance (5)

This course provides a framework for understanding the basics of financial literacy.  Emphasis is placed on students becoming familiar with key components of the Armenian financial system as they relate to personal financial health.  Topics to be addressed are an understanding of money origination and its turnover, basics of investing, insurance, banking products such as loans and savings accounts, credit and debit cards, current accounts, and others.  The course will also study the major principles of different types of interest calculations and, finally, the importance of having and maintaining a good credit score.  Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

BUS 288 Business Analytics (4, 5, 7, 8, 9)

This course will introduce the main concepts in business analytics, which will allow achieving fluency in four paradigms that account for most business decisions: marketing, operations, human resources and financial analytics. Students will learn how to explore and visualize the data and develop an analytic mindset that will help you make strategic decisions based on data. Students also explore the common pitfalls in interpreting statistical arguments, especially those associated with big data. Collectively, this course will help students internalize a core set of practical and effective methods and concepts, and apply them to solve some real world problems. In the final Project, students will apply their skills to interpret a real-world data set and make appropriate business strategy recommendations. In addition to the readings, there are 5 graded problem sets and ungraded review problem sets at the beginning and end of the course. The problem sets have both analytical and computational exercise components. The statistical analysis will be conducted using IBM SPSS Statistics, IBM SPSS Modeler and MS Excel. Three hour instructor led class-time weekly.  Prerequisites: Students should be familiar with basic concepts in calculus, probability theory and statistical inference. Students should have covered at least one course on Mathematics and one on Statistics (BUS 109 Business Mathematics and BUS 110 Applied Statistics OR MATH 106 Probability & Statistics OR CS 100 Calculus I and CS 107 Probability) CS 100, or BUS 109, or BUS 110, or Instructor’s Permission       

CHSS 111 Introduction to Ethics (3, 6)

This course introduces students to major ethical theories:  virtue ethics, deontology and utilitarianism.    Students will use these frameworks to analyze ethical issues and develop their own positions to perennial problems.  Special emphasis is placed on linking philosophical discussions to topics relevant to students as learners, workers, and citizens which may include numerous aspects of personal, social, professional and political life.   Students will read carefully selected readings from classical and contemporary philosophers.  Through rigorous inclass debates and discussions, students will be challenged to consider ethical dilemmas from different perspectives and weigh the strengths and shortcomings of various ethical theories.  Home tasks will include readings and writing assignments. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

CHSS 125 History of the Middle East (2, 4)

A critical survey of the history of the Middle East from the period of Hellenism (323 BCE) to the present. The course especially focuses on the interplay of powerful political, cultural, economic and ideological forces that brought to life the formation and rise of Christianity and Islam, the millennial conflict between the Islamic and European imperialisms, interactions between the Roman-Byzantine, Iranian, Arab, and Turkic ethno-cultural worlds and political systems, westernization and transformations of the Middle East in the course of the First and Second World Wars, and the current regional sociopolitical and economic dynamics. Special attention is paid to the place of Armenia and Armenians in Middle Eastern history. This is a lecture course enhanced by students’ analysis of readings concerning main and supplementary topics. Evaluation is based on letter grading of students’ individual oral presentations, research essays, quizzes, and participation in group projects.

CHSS 128 History of the Modern World (2,4)

A critical introductory survey of the history of the Modern World from the beginning of the Age of Great Geographic Discoveries in the 15th century to the present. The course explores especially the foundations and transformations of modern imperialism, globalization, nation state, industrializations, forms of sociopolitical and economic organization, financial capitalism, international and domestic competition and conflict, the current technological civilization and humanism, the individual and the collective from a general perspective of history of civilizations. This is a lecture course enhanced by students’ analysis of readings concerning main and supplementary topics. Evaluation is based on letter grading of students’ individual oral presentations, research essays, quizzes, and participation to group projects.

CHSS 141 Understanding the Twentieth Century through Music (1,2)

This course is designed to give students insight into the various cultural, political, economic, social and artistic developments of the twentieth century through the study of different types of music written between 1901 and 2000. Music is an indicator and/or trigger of significant social changes of the past century. The course is focused on revealing the social and cultural circumstances at the root of musical developments, regardless of the type of music (academic, pop/rock, alternative, etc.) The course introduces a vast number of terms and ideas that have influenced both music history, as well as many other fields of modern culture and life. Special attention is paid to the formation of the music industry as a separate and potent market.  The course requires listening to music in and out of class, reading articles related to the history of music and modern history in general, engaging in class discussion, as well as writing short papers on various topics. The course may also include a research paper or class presentation as an individual or group project. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

CHSS 142 Music Theory (1)

This course aims to provide students with insight into basic understandings of elementary theory of classical music: Western notation system, musical intervals, chords and their progressions, key, scales, modality, rhythm and meter, as well as basics of classical harmony. The course is designed to enhance understanding of theoretical background of Western classical music, thus paving the way to studying more complex musical disciplines, such as Music Analysis, and Musical Composition. The students will learn both special musical terminology, and its practical use, so the connection between theory and musical practice will also be discussed. The course requires listening to music in and out of class, class discussion, reading, and a number of written assignments including theoretical exercise and basic analysis of musical samples. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.   Prerequisites: Instructor’s Permission     

CHSS 152 Introduction to Korean Language and Culture (1,2,4)

This course introduces students to the basics of Korean language, culture and history, as well as current trends in Korean society and economy. The course also explores Korean identity and its relationship with other countries in the region, through film, media, literature, and popular culture. By the end of the course students should be familiar with simple phrases and the Korean alphabet and able to identify key Korean historic and cultural figures and events, and explain the salient features of Korean culture, its origins and evolution. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

CHSS 155 Introduction to Russian Language and Culture (1, 2, 4)

This course explores the development of the Russian culture from historical and comparative perspectives. This course systematically covers the events, factors and figures that have shaped Russian civilization and worldview as reflected in literature, film and the arts.  The course is designed to develop critical thinking and analytical skills through class discussions and projects about Russia’s past and present situation.  Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

CHSS 157 Introduction to Italian Language and Culture (1,2,4)

This course explores the development of Italian culture in search of understanding “what makes an Italian Italian and Italy Italy.”  Students will become acquainted with the historical events, internal and external, that have played major roles in developing and shaping Italy’s social makeup, unifying its culture, socio-economic system, philosophy of life, remaking of its geographical boundaries, creations of its diversified regions with their specific foods, music, arts and architectures. Students will be exposed to some characteristics of Italian language and learn some commonly used expressions including body-language. To develop a fuller understanding of the issues, students will use a variety of sources and resources—media, film, literature, and essays.  Assessment includes papers, exams and presentations.   Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

CHSS 181 Introduction to Sociology (4, 6)

This course explores how societies function and change over time. Students will use sociological concepts and theories to analyze human behavior, social life, social policies, and social change, both in their individual lives, in their communities, and in the global community at large. Throughout the course, students will evaluate social issues and problems taking into account the dynamic relationship between individuals and society. Topics might include ethnic relations, sexism, and class bias. Home tasks will include readings and writing assignments. Three hours of instructor-led class per week.

CHSS 185 Introduction to Genocide Studies (2, 4)

Genocide is a crime against humanity that has occurred throughout history.  This course will focus on genocide in the 20th and 21st centuries from legal, political, sociological, psychological, cultural, ethical, ethnic, religious, economic, historical and comparative perspectives.  Special attention is paid to the Armenian Genocide, Jewish Holocaust, Rwandan Genocide, and other 20th and 21st century genocides, the Genocide Convention, the International Criminal Court, and other institutional and international responses to genocide.   Prevention, intervention, deterrence, and remedies for genocide are also covered in the course, as well as genocide education and reconciliation.   Assessment based on essays, examinations and presentations.  Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

CHSS 210 Philosophy, Politics and Economics Seminar (3, 4, 5)

This course integrates the methods of the three component disciplines of the PPE minor. Students will apply the methods, theories and concepts learnt in PPE courses to various problems or policy questions. The course aims to enable students to analyse, propose, and defend policies from philosophical, political, and economic perspectives. In weeks 1-5, students will study a selection of readings on PPE and write a paper defending a position in a specific policy area. In weeks 6-8 several guest lecturers will make presentations on current policies of Armenia. In the remainder of the course, students will propose their own policy study and write a paper critically analyzing different policy options and defending a specific policy. Prerequisites:   One lower division course it clusters with, or instructor’s permission.  Priority enrollment for PPE minors. 

CHSS 212 Epistemology and Philosophy of Science (3, 7, 8, 9)

This course discusses fundamental issues related to knowledge and science.  The course addresses fundamental epistemological questions such as:  What is knowledge?  Is knowledge possible?   What is truth and what are criteria of truth?  Is there a priori knowledge?  On what grounds is knowledge justified?  What is the difference between science and truth?   The course will also discuss central issues philosophy of science, such as the nature and limits of scientific knowledge, theories of scientific progress and social status of science, and differences between of natural and social sciences.    Assessment will include papers, exams and presentations.   Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.  Prerequisites: CHSS110, CSE111 or instructor’s permission       

CHSS 230 Asian Art (1,2)

An iconographic and aesthetic analysis of the three principal Asian religious traditions: Buddhist, Hindu, and Islamic. Study of painting, sculpture and architecture as reflective of various cultures’ definitions of the Divine, life and the afterlife and value structures. Emphasis on the silk route and migration of style. Exams and final paper. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.  Prerequisites: CHSS 130, one other lower division course it clusters with, or instructor’s permission        

CHSS 233 Creative Productions (1, 2)

Creative Production is an advanced, interdisciplinary course covering the theory, analysis and practice of producing creative works in various media.    The theoretical component has two inter-related elements: (1) Articles on the theories on creativity, imagination, aesthetic emotions, (2) Works of Art (literature, film, animation, TV, fine art and photography, etc.) carefully chosen as illustrative examples of those theories. The practical component includes different creative exercises, experiences, workshops, etc., and a semester-long creative production (written work, theater monologue/duologue/scene, musical video, short film script, photo stories etc.) that students will choose to realize individually or in a team. This final production will be accompanied by a reflection paper.  Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.   Prerequisites:  Instructor’s permission       

CHSS 240 Music & Literature (1, 2)

This course is designed to give students insight into the various cultural, political, economic, social and artistic developments of the twentieth century through the study of different types of music written between 1901 and 2000. Music is an indicator and/or trigger of significant social changes of the past century. The course is focused on revealing the social and cultural circumstances at the root of musical developments, regardless of the type of music (academic, pop/rock, alternative, etc.) The course introduces a vast number of terms and ideas that have influenced both music history, as well as many other fields of modern culture and life. Special attention is paid to the formation of the music industry as a separate and potent market. The course requires listening to music in and out of class, reading articles related to the history of music and modern history in general, engaging in class discussion, as well as writing short papers on various topics. The course may also include a research paper or class presentation as an individual or group project. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Prerequisites: One lower division course it clusters with, or instructor’s permission        

CHSS 251 Topics in Cinema (1,2,4)

This course examines the cultural fault lines between generations arising from immigration – forced or voluntary.  Building on what they have studied in other Gen Ed courses, students analyze films depicting ethnicity and culture as intrinsically intertwined and explore the linguistic, cultural and communication gaps between children of immigrants and their parents and/or grandparents.  The course also grounds discussion and analysis in fiction and nonfiction writings that address cultural identity, assimilation/integration/alienation, acculturation, the role of memory in history, cultural roots and rhizomes, and the “poetics of relation.” Three hours of instruction-led instruction per week. Prerequisites: One lower division course that clusters with.

CHSS 255 Russian Professional Communication (1, 2, 5)

This course is designed for those who would like to feel confident using Russian language in professional life. This course focuses on developing oral and written skills in the business setting and emphasizes memo writing, business letters, publicity, oral reporting, interviewing and professional presentations. Special attention is given to intercultural communication. Through observing, simulating and experiencing incidents of cross-cultural communication, students will begin to examine and develop skills that are necessary for effective production of oral and written texts and for successful intercultural communication among Russians and achieve a high level of language proficiency in Russian language.  Assessment includes papers, written and oral presentations, and exams.   Three hours of instructor-led class time per week. Prerequisites: Instructor’s permission    

CHSS 256 Latin Language & Literature (1, 2)

This course aims to deepen the knowledge and understanding of Latin language and literature and their role in the evolution of European culture and society.   Students will acquire a higher level of Latin reading knowledge through study of excerpts from original texts. Special emphasis will be placed on the relationship between Latin and English (vocabulary, phraseology and syntax).   The course will involve study and research of Medieval European societies, culture, religion (Christianity), education, literature, philosophy and architecture.   Assessment will include exams, papers, and presentations.   Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.   Prerequisites: CHSS 156 or instructor’s permission   

CHSS 261 Armenian Literature in Perspective (1,2)

This course exposes students to a variety of texts by Armenian and non-Armenian writers focusing on a specific historical period. Students will study the literary values of these texts to gain an understanding of how literary texts construct and reflect the collective imagination of that period. In this respect, the course discusses literary texts as the materialized aspirations of their authors on the one hand, and as the collective dream of a community on the other hand.  The particular historical period will change each semester.  The course is based on a semester-long student research project. In the beginning of the semester, each student chooses a cultural issue that he/she is interested in.   Three hours of instructor-led class time per week. Prerequisites: FND 104, or instructor’s permission      

CHSS 262 Russian Language and Literature (1,2)

This course, to be taught in Russian, is designed to introduce students to selected masterpieces of Russian literature and to improve their ability to read complex written works. Through understanding the biographical and historical context, main ideas, aesthetic principles and literary techniques of the most prominent Russian writers, students will develop research, writing and discussion skills that will be transferable to various disciplines and professions. Assessment will include papers, essay, exams and presentations.   Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.   Prerequisites:    Instructor’s permission     

CHSS 272 Comparative Religion (1, 2, 3, 4, 6)

This course examines world religious traditions from a comparative perspective. Students will be introduced to the basic tenets, worldview, and practices of the major religious traditions around the world, polytheistic traditions, Asian religions, Judaism, Christianity and Islam, as well as new religious movements. The course will also examine the sacred texts of various religions.  Upon completing the course, students should be familiar with the key beliefs and practices of the major religions and gain an appreciation of the diversity of religious experience through time and across cultures. The course also aims to equip students with concepts and frames for thinking critically about the relationship of Christianity to other religious traditions and comparing the dogmatic, doctrinal and ritualistic practices within various religious traditions. The course combines lectures, in-class discussions, and analytical essays. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.  Prerequisites:  CHSS 114 or Instructor’s permission  

CHSS 280 Clinical Psychology (3, 6)

Psychology is the study of the mind and behavior. This course will review theories of the mind and investigate normal human growth and development.  We will examine the life cycle of man from infancy to old age.  Personality disorders, neurosis, psychoses, substance abuse and developmental disabilities will be presented.  The class will include assessment of the individual by clinical interview. The types of psychological tests that a clinical psychologist uses to assess individuals will be identified.  An overview of current treatments of emotional disturbances with medication will be presented. Discussion of relevant topics in the field of clinical psychology will include ethics, educational, industrial, sports and forensic issues. Research methods will be introduced.  The course will conclude with a review of current therapeutic modalities. Three hours of instructor-led class per week.  Prerequisites: One lower division course it clusters with, or instructor’s permission     

CHSS 281 Human Development and Personality (3, 6, 7)

This course provides an overview of the major theories and topics in human development and to the major topics in personality formation. Topics include theories on normal human growth and the human lifecycle from infancy to old age, with special attention to learning, temperament, personality. Special attention will be paid to childhood development.   Upon completing the course, student should gain an understanding of how human thinking, learning, and physical abilities vary and evolve at different ages and stages, and how these various aspects of development influence one another.  Assessment includes tests, paper, case studies and presentations.   Three hours of instructor-led class per week. Prerequisites: CHSS180, or instructors’ permission    

CHSS 282 Trade (4, 5)

This course examines the international trade system and the economic concepts and political institutions upon which it is based. Topics covered include a brief history of the development of trade, players and processes involved in trade, the role of trade in development, trade policy and politics, comparative and competitive advantages of nations, gains and losses from trade, international trade negotiations, and effects of regionalization and globalization. The course has an interdisciplinary approach, drawing on case-studies, theory and empirical studies. Students will be expected to make individual and group presentations and engage in case-study analysis in discussion. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week. Prerequisites: One lower division course it clusters with, or instructor’s permission  

CHSS 285 Genocide Studies and Human Rights Seminar (2, 4)

This upper-level interdisciplinary course explores in-depth one or more themes the phenomenon of genocide as a gross violation of human rights through class discussion, research and presentations.   Themes may include genocide prevention and education, genocide reparations and remedies, genocide interventions and righteous/rescuers, and will vary from year to year.  Assessment based on class preparation, contribution to class discussion, final presentation.

Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.  Prerequisites: One lower division course it clusters with, or instructor’s permission.   Priority enrollment for GSHR minors. 

CHSS 291 Modernism (1, 2, 4)

This course is designed to develop students’ skills in analysis, critical thinking, and communication. From 1890-1950 the western world went through a profound transformation that involved industrialization, two world wars, the erosion of colonialism, the rise of psychology, Fascism, Communism, and other massive historical events. At the same time, there was an explosion of innovative literary and artistic output to make sense of all these intense changes: it became a movement known as Modernism. In this course students will engage with various modernist texts which may include poetry, fiction, essays, and also art, films, and music. They will be expected to keep a reading journal and/or write in-class responses to readings. Students will be required to participate in class discussions and give one presentation to the class. There will be a mid-term exam, final exam, quizzes, as well as written assignments. Three hours of instructor-led discussions per week, along with in-class and take home assignments.  Prerequisites: One lower division course it clusters with, or instructor’s permission 

CSE 111 The Scientific Method and Critical Thinking (3, 6, 7, 8, 9)

Science and technology proficiency is indispensable for functioning in modern societies. We are overwhelmed with instant information in all sensory formats and we must be able to discriminate between facts and fallacies, while recognizing our own underlying biases. In this course, the student is introduced to the basic tenets of the scientific method, critical thinking and illustrated real world examples and case studies, with several general topics examined in depth. Such topics includes: pharmaceutical studies, computer performance claims, climate change, emerging technologies, marketing and advertisement, international relations, political and partisan hyperbole.

CSE 112 Mathematical Thinking (7, 8, 9)  (not open to CS majors)

Students will explore and develop quantitative analysis and numeracy skills, rooted in logic-based intuition, that are essential to succeed regardless of profession.  In this course, students will expand critical thinking skills in the context of understanding and analyzing data and presenting findings/conclusions through the practical application of mathematical theories, principles and techniques rooted in algebra, calculus, probability and statistics in subjects such as demographics, finance, medicine, politics and economics.  Through the use of advanced Microsoft Excel functions and formulas, students will expand problem-solving skills.  Students will prepare oral and written reports that utilize concepts of the effective visual display of quantitative information to optimize how to summarize and explain mathematical solutions that emphasize clear and effective communication.  Three hours of instructor led class time per week.   Note:  CSE112 is not open to CS majors

CSE 120 Introduction to the World of Programming (7, 8, 9) (not open to CS majors)  

This course covers the topics related to the role of computers in our everyday life. Topics include high level overview of: history of computers, the architecture of personal computers, mobile devices and other smart gadgets, the structure of internet and cloud, search engines, data storages, data analytics tools, information management tools and information security. Students will learn to write basic programs, implement basic algorithms, collect and store data, browse the data in the web with smart search engines and which is very important understand the key areas of information security. This course is designed for students with no prior background of computer science. Three hours of instructor led class per week including discussions.  Note:  CSE120 is not open to CS majors.

CSE 162 Introduction to Bioscience and its Impact on Research Business and Society (7, 8, 9)

This course introduces students to important concepts, techniques and applications of bioscience, and explores its impact on research, business and society.  Students will study basic concepts of molecular and cellular biology, biochemistry, molecular genetics, computational biology and biotechnology.  Some important applications of molecular and cellular biology in medicine and industry – such as molecular diagnostics of diseases, stem cell and transplantation, drug design and genetically modified foods – will be introduced.  Students will also discuss the political, ethical, and legal issues accompanying these topics and their current and future impact on society. Three hours of instructor led class time per week.

CSE 171 Conceptual Physics (7, 8, 9) (not open to CS majors)

This course will explore the basic concepts in physics and physical processes.  The conceptual viewpoint taken in the course will focus more on the physical description of the processes and phenomena rather than the detailed mathematical equations that govern them.  The course will cover topics in mechanics of moving bodies, heat transfer, propagation of sound, properties of light, electricity and magnetism with special emphasis on everyday experience and practical illustrations taken from real life, e.g. art, music, sports, the home.  For each of the processes covered in the course, a brief historical perspective will be given, followed by a description of its physical principles, and finally the basic equations that describe it mathematically. Students will be exposed to real-life applications of the theories discussed in the classroom.  Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.    Note:  CSE171 is not open to CS majors. 

CSE 210 Historical Development of Mathematical Ideas (3, 7, 8, 9)

This course will provide an exploration into the history, birth and development of mathematical ideas, problems and people behind them. Topics will include: Infinity and Paradoxes; Numbers and Set Theory; Algebraic Equations and Algebra; Limits and Calculus; Shapes, Symmetry and Geometry; Gambling, Uncertainty and Probability; Physics and Differential Equations; Choice and Game Theory; Data Analysis and Statistics. Students are required to complete problem sets and quizzes, and to complete a group project, as well to conduct collaborative research. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week including discussions.  Prerequisites: One lower division course it clusters with, or instructor’s permission

CSE 264 Human Brain (3, 6, 7)

This course is designed to provide an understanding of how the human brain works.

The course will cover an introduction to the brain anatomy and the cellular function of neurons, synapses and neurotransmitters. The work of human brain in health and in some disorders as well as the mechanisms of vision, learning, memory, feelings and emotions will be discussed.  Applications of the knowledge may be relevant in a variety of realms including for marketing specialists, user interface and software developers as well as public policy makers and educators.  Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.Prerequisites:   One lower division course it clusters with, or instructor’s permission          

CSE 263 Human Physiology (7)

This course aims to build knowledge of interplay between 9 organ systems responsible for healthy functioning of human organism. It will encompass the whole complexity of human body from cells and tissues to the organism, underpinning the role of every structure in human life processes. Important diseases will be related with their causes and consequences as examples of disturbed homeostasis and dysfunction of human body systems. Students will attend lectures and engage in group work on human life processes, as well as carry out literature research and interpretation aiming to develop skills necessary for reading and understanding publications on health related topics. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.  Prerequisites:   One lower division course it clusters with, or instructor’s permission          

CSE 291 Product Design (1,5, 9)

An introduction to 3D design techniques and graphics communication tools necessary for a product design. Students learn 3D modeling, assembling, mechanism design, and simulation tools via Parametric Technology Corporation (PTC) company’s online tutorials and demonstrations. Through number of lectures they learn also basic product design communication tools – drawing standards, units, projection views, dimensioning, sections, etc. The knowledge acquired during the course will help students transform their ideas to Computer-Aided Design 3D models and drawings. Also, they will be prepared to apply these powerful design tools in further more advanced courses and their work practice. The evaluation will be done through PTC Precision Learning portal self-assessment questions, home assignments and product design project.  Prerequisites: One lower division course it clusters with, or instructor’s permission.  Corequisites: CS 108 Statistics

 ENV 101 Introduction to Environmental Sciences (7, 8, 9)

The course aims to introduce students to basic environmental science principles, including the structure and functioning of ecosystems and their physical and bio-chemical cycles. The course will emphasize the importance of these processes for human health as well as human impact on these processes. As a science course, the course will teach students to use the methods of scientific inquiry to raise questions about global systems, their impact on humans, and human impact on them. Specific topics to be covered include but are not limited to biodiversity, quantity and quality of water, land and air resources, environmental conservation, human population trends and dynamic, food and industrial production, and waste and toxicity. Topics will be supplemented by Armenia and Caucasus-specific cases and problem sets. Students are required to attend three field trips over the weekend. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

ENV 170 Chemistry in Everyday Life (7, 8, 9)

The course highlights and discusses the practical chemical world of human beings and the chemical nature of everyday processes. The role of chemistry in necessities of daily life such as the chemistry of life, agriculture, food, housing, healthcare, clothing, transport and communications will be discussed. In addition the course will introduce various applications of chemistry in the area of arts, crime and law enforcement, consumer products, cosmetics and warfare. As a science-based, quantitative course, the course will teach students the methods of scientific inquiry, including experimental design and chemical analytical methods, data generation and analysis, and presentation of the final results.

ENV 202 Projects in Environmental Sciences (7, 8, 9)

This upper division course is designed for undergraduate students to gain a deeper understanding and competence in environmental project design, implementation, and evaluation. The projects can be in technology, science, conservation, management, restoration, promotion/marketing, education, and other related topics. The course, however, emphasizes data collection and analysis for assessing the success and impact of project ideas. The students will design and complete a project for the course. The types of environmental projects will vary depending on student and faculty agreement. The projects may be related to the following broad topics: Clean technologies; IT, satellite, remote sensing solutions in environmental protection; alternative transport, clean transport; renewable-energy generation or energy efficiency; sustainable water use, solid waste management, sustainable agriculture and food production; mining pollution prevention/ management; forest protection/management/restoration; watershed  rotection/management/restoration; air-quality protection/management/restoration; and flora or fauna monitoring/conservation/restoration.  Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.  Prerequisites: One lower division course it clusters with, or instructor’s permission   \

ENV 203 Environmental Monitoring (4, 7, 8, 9)

The course will highlight principles and techniques of effective environmental monitoring of air, water, soils, food, living organisms, and products. The course will cover environmental science and industrial hygiene approaches for anticipating, recognizing, evaluating, and controlling environmental issues with the primary emphasis on recognizing and evaluating the risk of contaminants. The course will also emphasize environmental investigative techniques, instrument selection, and quality control including documentation, calibration, and sample management. The field component of the course will involve ‘hands-on’ approaches to assessing environmental issues in the surrounding environment.  Prerequisites: One lower division course it clusters with, or instructor’s permission                

ENV 210 Disasters (7, 8, 9)

This course explores the history, fundamentals, principles, theories, and approaches to disaster management.  Students study natural and manmade disasters and the planning and management tools available for preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation.  Topical investigations include: an overview of disaster management, the range of physical and human impacts, the role of decision-makers and the general public, and structural and non-structural techniques in this quantitative science course.  Armenia- specific cases and scenarios are also considered and discussed.  Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.  Prerequisites: One lower division course it clusters with, or instructor’s permission        

ENV 211 Sustainable Cities (4, 7, 8, 9)

Since their early founding around 10,000 years ago, cities have become increasingly dominant as a place of human social, economic, and cultural organization. At the dawn of the 21st century, for the first time in human history, more than 50 percent of human population globally is living in cities, a share that is expected to continually grow in the foreseeable future. To ensure long-term human well-being and sustainable management of the cities’ pressures on global environmental systems, we need to address questions on how to manage and develop cities as places of human prosperity, social justice, and environmental balance and health. The course will cover advances to date on this topic. Concepts and tools that will be discussed include: a) urban metabolism (material and energy flows); b) urban ecology, the impact of cities on the living and nonliving environment and their interactions; c) connections between biodiversity, urban land-use patterns, transportation, food production/consumption, waste management, water and energy use, and chemical/material composition of the consumables and the built environment; d) role of resilient cities and potential of smart cities, data analytics, and technological advancement in improving sustainability of cities; and e) role of integrated urban planning and governance, including participatory and inclusive planning and governance. As a quantitative science course, the course will expect students to collect, analyze and present data as well as assess the merits of quantitative analysis by others.   Prerequisites: One lower division course it clusters with, or instructor’s permission                

ENV 212 Mining (4, 7, 8, 9)

The course introduces the basic concepts of mineral exploration, ore extraction, mineral processing, and mine waste management. While the topics of mining technologies and economics will be covered, the course will with a particular focus on related environmental, occupational safety, public health and social management issues and approaches. As a quantitative science course, emphasis will be placed on statistical, scientific, and engineering tools for understanding better management of mining operations. Additionally, the course will introduce some of the legal and policy topics related to good governance of the mining sector in a country. Both international and Armenia-specific cases will be used to highlight concepts and effective practices.  Prerequisites: One lower division course it clusters with, or instructor’s permission                

ENV 251 Forests (4, 7, 9)

 This course is designed for undergraduate students as an introduction into the world of forests. As a quantitative science course, students will use statistical and scientific tools to gain a deeper understanding of forests, forest-related processes, and management of this critical resource. The course will offer an introduction to the types of forests worldwide, the role of forests in ecosystem that protect the living environment, and their significance to human economies and well-being. Students will gain insights in the ecosystem services that forests provide, the importance of forests in climate and water-cycle regulation as well as biodiversity and soil protection. Forest management techniques and the role of good forest governance will be highlighted throughout the course. Topics will be supplemented by Armenia and Caucasus-specific cases and problem sets. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.  Prerequisites:  One lower division course it clusters with, or instructor’s permission              

LAW 101 Law in Everyday Life (4)

This course presents the basic principles of law as we experience it in everyday life.   It aims to inform students about their rights, duties and the predictable interactions people have with the legal system, from law enforcement to taxes and family law.  Students will learn how law is made, how it is applied in courts and by administrative bodies, how it regulates private relations and relations between the citizen and the state, through analysis and discussion about situations and cases from real life.  Assessment will include tests, papers, and presentations.  Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

LAW 110 Introduction to Armenian Justice System (4)

This course explains the institutions and processes of the Armenian justice system as they affect the lives of citizens, businesses and government agencies, including general courts, specialized courts, criminal, civil and administrative processes.   The course aims to equip students to understand their rights and remedies for violation of rights, as well as the role of various government bodies, courts, police, prosecutors, regulators, in the administration and establishment of justice in Armenian society.   Instructor-led course will draw on case studies to examine a range of common situations students, citizens, and businesses face in everyday life. .  Three hours of instructor-led class time per week

LAW 201 Armenian Constitution (4)

The course aims to present the evolution, structure and content of the Armenian Constitution in historical and comparative perspective.  The course will analyze the Armenian Constitution and its role in social, economic, and political life, including such topics as the separation of powers, the system of checks and balances, supremacy of the constitution, constitutional rights and values, and the roles, powers and responsibilities of various constitutionally defined government structures, including the President, the National Assembly, the Government, judiciary and local self-government bodies.  Special emphasis will be placed on direct application of constitutional provisions, including the protection of fundamental civil and human rights.  Instructor-led discussion, along with reading and written assignments. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week. Prerequisites:  One lower division course it clusters with, or instructor’s permission   

PH 101 Basics of Healthy Lifestyle (7)

The course provides an overview of concepts and issues related to mental, social, and physical dimensions of health with a focus on healthy behaviors and lifestyle. The course emphasizes preventive health practices which reduce risk factors associated with disease. The course enables students to analyze the relationship between healthy lifestyle and health and builds knowledge and skills to recognize and cope with health problems that they may face during their college years and later in life. Main topics include behavior change, mental health, stress and stress management, nutrition, addictions, physical exercise, and sexual behavior and STIs.

PH 201 Global Health (4, 7)

This multidisciplinary course is designed to explore global health and how it impacts all of us globally and locally. The course develops skillsets for interpreting, developing and using global health indicators and methods, and to explore the application of measures to improve the wellbeing of people globally and locally.   The course will include an exploration of topics including leading causes of death, disease and disability, mental health, socioeconomic impacts on health, maternal and child health, media and health, disasters and war (including earthquakes and genocide), climatic change, gender equity and humanitarianism.  The course will confer theory and practice for developing and measuring indicators of health and wellbeing.  Students will be graded based on quizzes and exams, group projects with real life problems, oral presentations and participation.  Prerequisites: One lower division course it clusters with, or instructor’s permission                

PSIA 101 Introduction to Political Science (4,5)

This course provides students with an introduction to the approaches in the study of politics.  The course explores major concepts prevalent in political science including power, democracy, political culture and constitutionalism.  It identifies the major fields of study within the discipline and familiarizes students with the differences in approach that each follow from a comparative perspective.  Students are expected to complete regular assignments in order to acquire knowledge and to practice skills discussed in class.

PSIA 103 Introduction to Armenian Government (4)

This course is a general introduction to the structure and functions of Armenian Government and its institutions, from historical, legal and comparative perspectives.  The role of each branch of the government, the scope of its authority, and checks and balances in the system, will be examined in light of constitutional design and ongoing political processes, along with the relationship between the national, regional and local levels of government.   Specific issues will include the state tax and budgeting process, fiscal accountability, lawmaking and regulation making, civic participation in the process, and mechanisms for public oversight of government activities and protection of individual rights as well as the military, law enforcement, and security agency’s special responsibilities and authority.   The course aims to help students understand the role of government in the 21st century and the rights and responsibilities of 21st citizen in public and governmental affairs, in light of international best practices and Armenia’s development. Three hours of instructor-led instruction per week.

PSIA 271 Religion and Politics (1, 2, 3, 4, 6)

What is the relationship between religion and politics? This course examines the meanings of and interactions between, religion and politics in comparative politics and international relations.  Contrary to theories about toward secularization recent developments underscore the important role religion continues to play in world politics.  In many countries religious beliefs, practices and institutions shape individual values, social organizations, state institutions and international.  The course will examine trends and theories on the of religion in public life, in state and global politics, including separation of church and state (i.e., state secularism); nationalism and religion; war and peace; non-discrimination, and gender issues.  Issues of religion, church and state in Armenia will also be discussed in the context of global developments.  Assessment will include tests, essays, and presentations.   Three hours of instructor-led class time per weekPrerequisites:   CHSS114 or Instructor’s permission      

PSIA 281 Development Policy (4, 5)

This course is a survey of the literature on key determinants of development “Development” at the state level and “development” at the project level.  We begin by considering some of the factors that drive state development, including economic growth, poverty reduction, social inequality, etc. We study different development models most popular in different periods of time, and then move on to the analysis of state policies in health and education, population and migration, and the linkages between investments in human capital and economic growth.  The course then moves on  to other key topics in international development including accountability and good governance, conditionalities, monitoring and evaluation of results, etc.  The course concludes with a discussion on the scope and limitations of foreign aid and the institutions that implement aid policies. Three hours of instructor-led class per week.   Prerequisites: One lower division course it clusters with, or instructor’s permission