Please note that all General Education (GenEd) courses listed below are 3 credits each.
The numbers in parenthesis indicate the quadrant for GenEd course cluster formation. Courses from the same quadrant form clusters that satisfy the GenEd breadth requirement.

  •  Arts & Humanities (AH) – Quadrants 1, 2, 3
  •  Social Sciences (SS) – Quadrants 4, 5, 6
  •  Quantitative Sciences (QS) – Quadrants 7, 8, 9

CHSS 110 Introduction to Philosophy (3, 6)
This course aims at introducing students to some fundamental problems from various branches of philosophy: ontology, epistemology and ethics. Questions regarding the existence of matter, God, causation, free will and other minds, the possibility of knowledge, as well as some ethical questions will be addressed during the course. Students will read carefully selected writings from classical and modern philosophers. Students will be asked to write short essays and participate in well-structured debates and discussions. This course will help students develop critical and creative thinking skills, the ability to deal with uncertainty, conceptualize and theoretically analyze real life situations and problems. Home tasks will include readings and writing assignments. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

CHSS 114 Introduction to Religion (2, 3, 6)
The course examines religion as a phenomenon of human culture. It firstly introduces the students to the main theoretical approaches and methods through which religion has been studied by historians and social scientists. Secondly, the course looks at the major themes in the study of religion. These themes will be examined drawing on particular religious traditions and through the lens of the theoretical approaches covered. Readings will include theoretical writings about religion by classics and contemporary authors, and primary texts from various religious traditions and by representatives of those traditions. The course combines lectures, in-class discussions, and analytical essays. Its broader aim is to give the students an understanding of the richness of the religious traditions of the world, and to develop skills to analyze religious phenomena and to situate them in their historical contexts. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

CHSS 127 World Civilizations I (2, 4)
The course explores the meaning and importance of interdisciplinary study of world history by introducing students to distinctive features and characteristics of civilizations that had developed in the Old and New worlds from the earliest times to 1700 CE. It will emphasize the importance of primary sources and of critical analysis of academic theories. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

CHSS 130 Introduction to Art (1)
This course is an introduction to the elements of art: texture, form, shape, color, line and tone/style, proportion, perspective (and for film and mobiles, time/rhythm) as aspects of an artifact, art as it is produced, and art as it is perceived. It is also a survey in both geographic and time dimensions of art as an expression of human creativity, focusing on painting, sculpture, architecture, photography and film, while making relevant connections to other aspects of culture: music, dance, ritual, literature, religion, technology, politics, commerce (advertising), and design. This course will introduce students to the language of art, increasing recognition and understanding of references in popular culture, on clothing, and in film and other media. Visits to museums and excursions will be included in the learning activities. Three hours of instructor-led class per week.
CHSS 140 Music Appreciation (1)
This course aims to equip students to listen to, understand and discuss music as a cultural and aesthetic form of human creativity through acquaintance with Western European classical music from various periods. In this course students will learn to identify the basic elements of music, instruments, voice, genres, and styles, and will learn terminology used to discuss pieces of music as an art form and historical creation of a particular composer and period. The basic underpinnings of music in physics, psychology and brain science will also be introduced. The course requires extensive listening to music in and out of class, class discussion, and short papers on various composers and compositions. The course may also include mandatory attendance at concerts and a short research paper or class presentation on a work or composer of the students’ choice as an individual or group project.

CHSS 151 Intro to French Language & Culture (1, 2, 4)
In this course, students will explore how French culture has been shaped by language, geography, historical events, and foreign and internal forces and groups. We will also examine how France and the French language have played an important role in the areas of culture, arts, cinema, fashion, and cuisine. The importance of the French language and culture has waxed and waned over the centuries, depending on France’s economic, political and military importance. French culture today is marked both by great ethnic, regional, and socio-economic diversity and by strong unifying tendencies. Through the study of a variety of sources including media, film, literature, and visual arts, students will gain an understanding of what constitutes the “French identity” of the 21st century.

CHSS 155 Introduction to Russian Language and Culture (1, 2, 4)
Introduction to Russian Language & Culture explores the development of the Russian culture from historical and comparative perspectives. This course systematically covers the events, factors and figures that have shaped Russian civilization and worldview as reflected in literature, film and the arts. The course is designed to develop critical thinking and analytical skills through class discussions and projects about Russia’s past and present situation. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

CHSS 156 Introduction to Latin Language and Culture (1, 2, 4)
Introduction to Latin Language & Culture aims to give students a working knowledge of Latin grammar sufficient to read basic texts and appreciate the rich literary and cultural heritage of the classical Latin tradition. Texts and culture will be considered in their historical context, with special emphasis on their continuing influence. In addition to excerpts from original texts, students will be exposed to more extended works of history, philosophy and culture in translation, with the aim of gaining insights into the sources of Western civilization. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

CHSS 157 Introduction to Italian Language and Culture (1, 2, 4)
This course explores the development of Italian culture in search of understanding “what makes an Italian Italian and Italy Italy.” Students will become acquainted with the historical events, internal and external, that have played major roles in developing and shaping Italy’s social makeup, unifying its culture, socio-economic system, philosophy of life, remaking of its geographical boundaries, creations of its diversified regions with their specific foods, music, arts and architectures. Students will be exposed to some characteristics of Italian language and learn some commonly used expressions including body-language. To develop a fuller understanding of the issues, students will use a variety of sources and resources—media, film, literature, and essays. Assessment includes papers, exams and presentations. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

CHSS 15X Introduction to Chinese Language and Culture (1, 2, 4)
This course introduces students to the basics of Chinese language, culture and history, as well as current trends in Chinese society and economy. The course also explores Chinese identity and its relationship with other countries in the region, through film, media, literature, and popular culture. The course familiarizes students with simple phrases and the Chinese writing system as well as key figures, events and features of Chinese culture, its origins and evolution. Instructor-led class may include lectures, discussions, case studies, readings, group work. Assessment may include class participation, papers, essays, quizzes, exams, projects and presentations.

CHSS 180 Introduction to Psychology (3, 6)
This course introduces students to the fundamental principles of psychology and to the major topics of psychological inquiry. Topics include theories of the mind and investigate normal human growth and development and examines the lifecycle of humans from infancy to old age. An overview of current psychological theories explores topics such as types of temperament, physiological bases of behavior, life-span development, altered states of consciousness, sensation, perception, memory, thinking, motivation, emotion, personality, individual differences and stress. The course will also include basics of experimental psychology and introductory research methods. Three hours of instructor-led class per week.

CHSS 185 Introduction to Genocide Studies (2, 4)
Genocide is a crime against humanity that has occurred throughout history. This course will focus on genocide in the 20th and 21st centuries from legal, political, sociological, psychological, cultural, ethical, ethnic, religious, economic, historical and comparative perspectives. Special attention is paid to the Armenian Genocide, Jewish Holocaust, Rwandan Genocide, and other 20th and 21st century genocides, the Genocide Convention, the International Criminal Court, and other institutional and international responses to genocide. Prevention, intervention, deterrence, and remedies for genocide are also covered in the course, as well as genocide education and reconciliation. Assessment based on essays, examinations and presentations. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

CHSS 255 Russian Professional Communication (1, 2, 5)
This course is designed for those who would like to feel confident using Russian language in professional life. This course focuses on developing oral and written skills in the business setting and emphasizes memo writing, business letters, publicity, oral reporting, interviewing and professional presentations. Special attention is given to intercultural communication. Through observing, simulating and experiencing incidents of cross-cultural communication, students will begin to examine and develop skills that are necessary for effective production of oral and written texts and for successful intercultural communication among Russians and achieve a high level of language proficiency in Russian language. Assessment includes papers, written and oral presentations, and exams. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week. Prerequisites: Instructor’s permission

CHSS 186 World Regional Geography (2, 4)
World Regional Geography is an introduction to the discipline of geography and how the discipline makes sense of the vast complexity of cultures, economies, and environments around the world. This course is an introductory examination of global geography using the regional geography approach which gives context by breaking down continents into smaller geographical segments that share similar qualities – economics, culture, religion, environment, language, geopolitics, defense, security, economic viability, etc. – and allows for deeper understanding and better dialogue when discussing global issues. Upon completion, students should be able to describe variations in physical and cultural features of a region and demonstrate an understanding of their functional relationships. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

CHSS 195 Introduction to Archeology (2, 4)
The course introduces students to world archaeology emphasizing its key achievements, concepts, practices, and importance to
contemporary society. The most interdisciplinary among social sciences and the humanities, current archaeology integrates in its practice approaches and methods across different fields of human knowledge: from linguistics and art history to
nuclear physics, biochemistry, computer science, and environmental studies. Although this is an introductory course to World Archaeology, topics discussed in the course are oftentimes illustrated with examples from the archaeology of
Armenia. Special attention is devoted to the distinctive role of archaeology and 2 cultural heritage management in the present and future of the Republic of Armenia and of the Armenian Diaspora. The course combines lectures, in-class discussions, and analytical essays. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

CHSS 202 Perspectives in Education (3, 6)
This course provides an overview of some key perspectives in education, tracing the path of educational thought from early Western thinkers up to contemporary trends in progressive education, and promoting critical thinking about how people should be educated. The course several major educational theories and the application of methods of historical and philosophical inquiry to examine current issues in education, including school readiness, literacy, integration, inclusiveness, diversity, and equity. Instructor-led class may include lectures, discussions, case studies, readings, group work. Assessment may include class participation, papers, essays, quizzes, exams, projects and presentations. Prerequisites: One lower division course it clusters with, or instructor’s permission.

CHSS 203 Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind (3, 6)
This course approaches mind from two points of view: psychological and philosophical, including the overlap between them. The course explores the philosophical assumption of the existence of the mind and various religious conceptions of the soul as notions of mind. The course starts from Descartes’s effort to establish there is a mind (at least his own, to begin with), moving to the reactions to the Cartesian views, which resonated with the scientific revolution of his time and continue to frame the discourse about mind. Instructor-led class may include lectures, discussions, case studies, readings, group work. Assessment may include class participation, papers, essays, quizzes, exams, projects and presentations. Prerequisites: One lower division course it clusters with, or instructor’s permission.

CHSS 221 Ancient Near East: History and Civilizations (2, 4)
A critical survey of the history and civilizations of the Ancient Near East from the earliest times to the collapse of
the Iranian Achaemenid Empire during the conquests of Alexander of Macedon in the fourth century BCE. The
course explores especially the origins of human culture and foundations of civilizations, the revolutionary growth
of technologies from the emergence of agriculture to the Iron Age; economies, ideologies, and authority in first
pristine states, social stratification, secondary state formation, the formation of world’s first empires and first
steps toward globalization. Geographically it covers Egypt, the Levant, Asia Minor, Mesopotamia, the Armenian
Highland, Caucasus, Iran, and the southern part of Central Asia, at the same time focusing on the diversity of
pathways in human history. Instructor-led class may include lectures, discussions, case studies, readings, group work. Assessment may include class participation, papers, essays, quizzes, exams, projects and presentations. Prerequisites: One lower division course it clusters with, or instructor’s permission.

CHSS 231 Armenian Visual Traditions (1,2)
This course surveys the history of both Eastern Armenian and Armenian Diasporic art from the late XIX to the late XX century. Artworks of Armenian painters of Eastern Armenia and Diaspora are presented along with a short overview of their lives. Issues of national identity as expressed through the visual arts are of special focus. During the course ample illustrative material is used. The course also includes attendance to Yerevan museums. At the end of the course students will be able to interpret XIX-XX century Armenian visual arts analytically within their historical and cultural context. It may also contribute to their personal growth and cultural awareness. The course requires in-class discussions (analyzing and comparing various artworks), short quizzes, midterm and final exams. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week. Prerequisites: One lower division course it clusters with, or instructor’s permission.

CHSS 234 Cultural Policy and Arts Management (1, 2, 4, 5)
This course presents the theory and practice of cultural policy and arts management, models and instruments of cultural policy, specifics of international cultural relations, legal issues on international and national levels. The course explores interrelation of culture with economy, tourism, education, problems of cultural heritage protection, museum and art gallery management. Other topics include different types of governmental support for culture, public-private partnership, community and civil society role, public relations in cultural institutions and projects, and engagement of media industry and information technologies for promoting culture and art. Instructor-led class may include lectures, discussions, case studies, readings, group work. Assessment may include class participation, papers, essays, quizzes, exams, projects and presentations. Prerequisites: One lower division course it clusters with, or instructor’s permission.

CHSS 240 Music & Literature (1)
This course is designed to give students insight into the various cultural, political, economic, social and artistic developments of the twentieth century through the study of different types of music written between 1901 and 2000. Music is an indicator and/or trigger of significant social changes of the past century. The course is focused on revealing the social and cultural circumstances at the root of musical developments, regardless of the type of music (academic, pop/rock, alternative, etc.) The course introduces a vast number of terms and ideas that have influenced both music history, as well as many other fields of modern culture and life. Special attention is paid to the formation of the music industry as a separate and potent market. The course requires listening to music in and out of class, reading articles related to the history of music and modern history in general, engaging in class discussion, as well as writing short papers on various topics. The course may also include a research paper or class presentation as an individual or group project. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week. Prerequisites: One lower division course it clusters with, or instructor’s permission.

CHSS 251 Topics in Cinema (1,2,4)
Cinema is a “universal language”, a multidimensional medium for telling stories and portraying reality from different perspectives to large, diverse and often dispersed audiences through sight and sound. Topics in Cinema examines a wide range of subjects in global cinema relating to both the artistry and socio-cultural significance of movies. The course will explore such topics as genre, international cinema, film criticism, and the role of film in society as it touches on such subjects as cultural identity, history, race and gender, and societal change. Instructor-led film viewing and discussion, along with reading and writing assignments.
Focus for Fall 2017: The Cinema of the Rising Sun
This semester the course will focus on the cinema of Japan, one of the oldest and most influential national cinemas in the world. Through a selection of critically acclaimed works we will study the worldviews and influence of some of Japan’s major directors of the 1950s and 60s – the golden age of Japanese filmmaking – and explore key themes and philosophical ideas that underlie their universal appeal.
Prerequisites: One lower division course it clusters with, or instructor’s permission.

CHSS 255 Russian Professional Communication (1, 2, 5)
This course is designed for those who would like to feel confident using Russian language in professional life. This course focuses on developing oral and written skills in the business setting and emphasizes memo writing, business letters, publicity, oral reporting, interviewing and professional presentations. Special attention is given to intercultural communication. Through observing, simulating and experiencing incidents of cross-cultural communication, students will begin to examine and develop skills that are necessary for effective production of oral and written texts and for successful intercultural communication among Russians and achieve a high level of language proficiency in Russian language. Assessment includes papers, written and oral presentations, and exams. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week. Prerequisites: Instructor’s permission
CHSS 261 Armenian Literature in Perspective (1, 2)
This course exposes students to a variety of texts by Armenian and non-Armenian writers focusing on a specific historical period. Students will study the literary values of these texts to gain an understanding of how literary texts construct and reflect the collective imagination of that period. In this respect, the course discusses literary texts as the materialized aspirations of their authors on the one hand, and as the collective dream of a community on the other hand. The particular historical period will change each semester. The course is based on a semester-long student research project. In the beginning of the semester, each student chooses a cultural issue that he/she is interested in. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week. Prerequisites: FND 104, or instructor’s permission

CHSS 282 Trade (4, 5)
This course examines the international trade system and the economic concepts and political institutions upon which it is based. Topics covered include a brief history of the development of trade, players and processes involved in trade, the role of trade in development, trade policy and politics, comparative and competitive advantages of nations, gains and losses from trade, international trade negotiations, and effects of regionalization and globalization. The course has an interdisciplinary approach, drawing on case-studies, theory and empirical studies. Students will be expected to make individual and group presentations and engage in case-study analysis in discussion. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week. Prerequisites: One lower division course it clusters with, or instructor’s permission

CHSS 292 Gender and Social Change (2, 4).
This course is an interdisciplinary women’s studies course with a global perspective, covering various theoretical and empirical approaches from the humanities and social sciences and political, economic and cultural perspectives. The course explores the dynamic ways in which gender is defined and evolves, as a social institution, and how those definitions affect power relations in society, including issues of class, race, ethnicity, and politics, and the impact of gender equality on development outcomes. The course will also take a comparative perspective, looking the local situation in an effort to understanding the role of women in the family and society. Instructor-led class may include lectures, discussions, case studies, readings, group work. Assessment may include class participation, papers, essays, quizzes, exams, projects and presentations. Prerequisites: One lower division course it clusters with, or instructor’s permission.

CSE 111 The Scientific Method and Critical Thinking (3, 6, 7, 8, 9)
Science and technology proficiency is indispensable for functioning in modern societies. We are overwhelmed with instant information in all sensory formats and we must be able to discriminate between facts and fallacies, while recognizing our own underlying biases. In this course, the student is introduced to the basic tenets of the scientific method, critical thinking and illustrated real world examples and case studies, with several general topics examined in depth. Such topics includes: pharmaceutical studies, computer performance claims, climate change, emerging technologies, marketing and advertisement, international relations, political and partisan hyperbole.

CSE 112 Mathematical Thinking (7, 8, 9) (not open to CS majors)
Students will explore and develop quantitative analysis and numeracy skills, rooted in logic-based intuition, that are essential to succeed regardless of profession. In this course, students will expand critical thinking skills in the context of understanding and analyzing data and presenting findings/conclusions through the practical application of mathematical theories, principles and techniques rooted in algebra, calculus, probability and statistics in subjects such as demographics, finance, medicine, politics and economics. Through the use of advanced Microsoft Excel functions and formulas, students will expand problem-solving skills. Students will prepare oral and written reports that utilize concepts of the effective visual display of quantitative information to optimize how to summarize and explain mathematical solutions that emphasize clear and effective communication. Three hours of instructor led class time per week. Note: CSE112 is not open to CS majors
CSE 145 Geographic Information Systems (7, 8, 9)
This course is meant to introduce students to geographic information systems (GIS) and spatial analysis: setting up, analysing, visualizing, and solving problems using data and maps. With advancements in the information technologies more and more industries are relying on GIS to analyze and visualize data. This course will look at applications of GIS in environmental sciences, public health, sustainable transportation planning, land use mapping, telecommunications, hydrology, meteorology, police dispatching, crime patterns, etc. The course will also look at remote sensing technologies like radar, LiDAR, GPS, and the role they play in collecting and analysing data. Another aim of this course is to spark interest in different types of students: from students interested in learning about GIS, to future professionals in fields regularly using GIS, to data enthusiasts and software developers. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

CSE 151 Introduction to Energy Sources (8, 9)
Energy drives the human civilization, and any economic growth or poverty alleviation directly involves use of energy resources. This course serves as an introduction to various sources of energy and the mechanisms to harness and convert them to more useful types of energy. Fossil fueled, solar, hydro and nuclear sources and some of their effects on the environment and safety issues will be discussed. This course fulfills general education requirements of the American University of Armenia. There are no prerequisites for this course beyond basic mathematical skills. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

CSE 162 Introduction to Bioscience and its Impact on Research Business and Society (7, 8, 9)
This course introduces students to important concepts, techniques and applications of bioscience, and explores its impact on research, business and society. Students will study basic concepts of molecular and cellular biology, biochemistry, molecular genetics, computational biology and biotechnology. Some important applications of molecular and cellular biology in medicine and industry – such as molecular diagnostics of diseases, stem cell and transplantation, drug design and genetically modified foods – will be introduced. Students will also discuss the political, ethical, and legal issues accompanying these topics and their current and future impact on society. Three hours of instructor led class time per week.

CSE 190 Engineering for Non-Engineers (7, 8, 9)
This course aims to give students an insight about basic principles of engineering and its different sub-disciplines. The course will explore the role engineering has played in shaping society today through its various advancements in different fields, e.g. manufacturing, the energy sector, urban development and materials engineering. Student evaluation will be based on individual or group projects, research essays and written examinations. Instructor-led class time. Not available to Engineering Sciences students.
CSE 241 Data Mining (7, 8, 9)
The goal of the course is to present the basic concepts of data analytics, starting from the basics of descriptive
statistics and ending with applications of text mining. Students will learn how the statistics is used to model uncertainty, discover patterns in data and make actionable decisions. Basic methods of statistical inference and predictive modeling will be covered. At the end of the class several advanced methods of data mining (boosting trees and neural networks) will be presented. The models and methods will be applied in different fields such as business, social sciences, health care, sports, etc. We will use open source analytical software R in doing statistical calculations. The students will also learn how to participate in world’s leading data mining competitions. No prior knowledge in programming or experience with R is necessary for the course. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week. Prerequisites: One lower division course it clusters with, or instructor’s permission.

CSE 285 How Things Work (7, 8, 9)
This course introduces students to detailed explanations behind the theory, function, and operation of selected technologies, answering the question, How does that work? This is a course in the physical and technological innovations in everyday life employing a minimum of mathematics. It explores the principles of automobiles, propulsion, digital media, cellular technologies, cyber security, nuclear and solar power generation, computer systems, etc. In-class demonstrations will aid in demystifying many topics. Lectures will look inside products from our daily lives to see what scientific principles make them work, focusing on their principles of operation, histories and relationships to one another. Students will work individually, and additionally, present to the class as a group on an emerging technology. The course will be split into three themes: The Digital World, Power and Energy, and Daily Motion. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week. Prerequisites: One lower division course it clusters with, or instructor’s permission.

CSE 270 Sports Analytics (7, 8, 9)
Professional sport organizations are using analytics to make better decisions on team formation, playing strategy etc. Enthusiasts use analytics to predict the outcome of a sporting event and to try to quantify reasons that lead to victory. The course will examine how different statistical and data analytics methods can be used to analyze game-day (in-play) sports data and for pre and post-game sports performance modelling. We will focus on several team games, e.g. soccer, basketball, American football and baseball. The course will use a statistical programming language such as R and assessment may include problem sets, individual or group projects and written examinations. Instructor led class time. Prerequisites: One lower division course it clusters with, or instructor’s permission.

CSE 271 Number Statistics and the Environment (7, 8, 9)
The course is a practical introduction to general quantitative and statistical techniques that can be applied to geography and environmental studies. Students will learn techniques to verify quality of data, analyzing trends and tendencies, and estimating probability of outcomes. The course will also cover topics such as proposing and verifying hypotheses using numbers and statistical analysis. Each topic will begin with an introduction to a numerical or statistical concept followed by the application of that concept on a real world environmental problem. As the course progresses, students will also be introduced to software that utilizes these concepts. Problem sets and written examinations. Instructor led class time. Prerequisites: One lower division course it clusters with, or instructor’s permission.

CSE 290 Start-Up Culture (5, 7, 8, 9)

TBD

ENV 101 Introduction to Environmental Sciences (7, 8, 9)
The course aims to introduce students to basic environmental science principles, including the structure and functioning of ecosystems and their physical and bio-chemical cycles. The course will emphasize the importance of these processes for human health as well as human impact on these processes. As a science course, the course will teach students to use the methods of scientific inquiry to raise questions about global systems, their impact on humans, and human impact on them. Specific topics to be covered include but are not limited to biodiversity, quantity and quality of water, land and air resources, environmental conservation, human population trends and dynamic, food and industrial production, and waste and toxicity. Topics will be supplemented by Armenia and Caucasus-specific cases and problem sets. Students are required to attend three field trips over the weekend. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

ENV 120 Food (7, 9)
This course provides a fundamental knowledge on food, its economics and environmental sustainability focusing on food values chains, production, and domestic and international marketing. This entails description of primary agricultural resources and inputs (including key environmental concerns related with these inputs), production technologies, post-harvest handling, logistics, marketing and state regulations and interventions. The course will also discuss government policies on food security, safety, trade, and environmental resilience and sustainability. Students will also learn developments in food industry such as genetically modified food, organic agriculture, fair trade, and reduction of food loss. Students will have to participate in one field visit to a food-production facility, which will most likely be organized on a weekend. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

ENV 140 Solid and Hazardous Waste (8, 9)
The course is designed for undergraduate students to understand the fundamental principles and key technologies of solid and hazardous waste management. It encompasses environmental and health effects of solid and hazardous wastes as well as the legal and regulatory framework that relates to waste management. The course will cover various waste streams (household, commercial, industrial, medical, etc.) and central principles of their management, including collection, handling, sorting, transportation, reprocessing/recycling, and disposal. The course will also discuss waste minimization strategies, zero-waste approaches, reuse and recycle technologies, and waste-to-energy solutions. As a science-based, quantitative course, the lectures and discussions will be supplemented with learning activities, such as visits to waste disposal sites, scientific investigations, and numerical problem solving. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

ENV 230 Water (7, 8)
Without adequate supply of freshwater our economies will not function and our health will not be secured. Human overuse and pollution of freshwater can also cause political conflict as well as damage ecosystems. This course will examine water from various perspectives including ecological, human health, resource stewardship, economic, and legal/political. Specific topics to be covered include water supply and use in manufacturing, mining, energy, agriculture and domestic life; potential for resource efficiency and optimization; water quality and types of water pollution, methods of testing and monitoring water quality and conditions of freshwater ecosystems; water purification and wastewater treatment; water planning and management tools/models including those for watersheds, surface, and ground waterresources; new technologies, such as desalination, to access freshwater; and international and national laws on water. The course includes field and lab work opportunities as well as introductory approaches to modeling water systems. Prerequisites: One lower division course it clusters with, or instructor’s permission.

ENV 250 Biodiversity: Conservation and Restoration (7)
This course is designed for undergraduate students to develop basic quantitative skills for deeper understanding of the causes and consequences of the current worldwide loss of plant, animal and other species. The course will cover the theory and practice of managing endangered species and the conservation and restoration of habitats and species populations. The course will emphasize how to apply science and the scientific method in the conservation and restoration of biodiversity. Worldwide as well as Armenia-specific cases will reviewed. A key expected outcome of the course is students’ competence in measuring trends using statistics and computing useful measures and indices. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week. Prerequisites: One lower division course it clusters with, or instructor’s permission.

ENV 204 Environmental Impact Assessment (4, 7, 8, 9)
TBD

LAW 142 Introduction to Human Rights (4)
The Introduction to Human Rights course will introduce students to the key concepts, rules and debates in the theory and the practice of contemporary international human rights. In particular, the course focuses on the historical development and philosophical and political foundations of human rights. Students will also explore international and national mechanisms for the protection of human rights, e.g. UN treaty and charter mechanisms, European systems of human rights protection, national judiciaries, human rights institutions and civil society organizations. Students will examine selected human rights and freedoms in order to understand human rights in practice. At the end of the course students learn the national and international legal grounds for limitations and derogations from human rights. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.

LAW 160 Law & Justice in Popular Culture (3, 4)
This course explores how legal concepts, role models, and professional ethos in popular culture promote and reinforce the rule of law. The course aims to explore how dedicated individuals using the skills and arts of persuasive and knowledge of the law can expand justice in their societies by the use of legal mechanisms. Through the medium of film and literature followed by class discussion, the following basic concepts are reviewed: social contract theory, professional ethics, rule of law (e.g. resort to courts and legal structures to resolve conflict as an alternative to violence), comparative review of legal systems (e.g. use of juries, class action mechanisms, etc.) and standard defendant rights (right against self‐incrimination, right to counsel), professional responsibility for attorneys and judicial ethics, and legal advocacy.

PSIA 101 Introduction to Political Science (4,5)
This course provides students with an introduction to the approaches in the study of politics. The course explores major concepts prevalent in political science including power, democracy, political culture and constitutionalism. It identifies the major fields of study within the discipline and familiarizes students with the differences in approach that each follow from a comparative perspective. Students are expected to complete regular assignments in order to acquire knowledge and to practice skills discussed in class.

PSIA 103 Introduction to Armenian Government (4)
This course is a general introduction to the structure and functions of Armenian Government and its institutions, from historical, legal and comparative perspectives. The role of each branch of the government, the scope of its authority, and checks and balances in the system, will be examined in light of constitutional design and ongoing political processes, along with the relationship between the national, regional and local levels of government. Specific issues will include the state tax and budgeting process, fiscal accountability, lawmaking and regulation making, civic participation in the process, and mechanisms for public oversight of government activities and protection of individual rights as well as the military, law enforcement, and security agency’s special responsibilities and authority. The course aims to help students understand the role of government in the 21st century and the rights and responsibilities of 21st citizen in public and governmental affairs, in light of international best practices and Armenia’s development. Three hours of instructor-led instruction per week.

PSIA 105 Introduction to International Relations (4)
This course aims to introduce students to a wide-range of concepts, tools and cases in the study of contemporary international relations. The course includes an overview of the essential history of the global system and introduces the foundational theories and alternative theories upon which much of the analyses of world politics is based, including game theory. The course explores how the international system, international law and diplomacy function in theory and practice. Instructor-led class may include lectures, discussions, case studies, readings, group work. Assessment may include class participation, papers, essays, quizzes, exams, projects and presentations.

PSIA 201 Political Philosophy (2, 3, 4)
This course examines some of the deepest questions about politics and society. Why should we have government and what would things be like without it? Is there a duty to obey government or are people sometimes justified in resisting it? What form should government take and in particular, is democracy the best form of government? How much freedom should people have and is society justified in restricting freedom? What form of property system should society have and should society try to redistribute income and wealth? We will also examine the contribution that feminism has made to social and political thought. The course is organized around five main topics: 1. State of Nature, 2. Political Obligation, 3. Forms of Government, 4. Freedom and Rights, 5. Property and Social Justice. Among the thinkers whose work will be covered are Plato, Aristotle, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, and Mill. Course work will involve essays, research, presentations, and close reading of philosophic texts. Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week. Prerequisites: One lower division course it clusters with, or instructor’s permission.

PSIA 281 Development Policy (4, 5)
This course is a survey of the literature on key determinants of development “Development” at the state level and “development” at the project level. We begin by considering some of the factors that drive state development, including economic growth, poverty reduction, social inequality, etc. We study different development models most popular in different periods of time, and then move on to the analysis of state policies in health and education, population and migration, and the linkages between investments in human capital and economic growth. The course then moves on to other key topics in international development including accountability and good governance, conditionalities, monitoring and evaluation of results, etc. The course concludes with a discussion on the scope and limitations of foreign aid and the institutions that implement aid policies. Three hours of instructor-led class per week. Prerequisites: One lower division course it clusters with, or instructor’s permission.

PSIA 282 Survey of Regional Politics (2, 4, 5)
Survey of Regional Politics aims to provide insights into the existing and emerging dynamics of the Caucasian region. The course will identify and analyze features of political cultures, traditions of statehood and key domestic developments in Turkey, Azerbaijan, Iran, Georgia, as well as foreign policy priorities and interests of Russia, EU, USA. Special attention will be paid to Armenia’s relations with its neighbors and different geopolitical interests pursued by major global stakeholders. The course consists of lectures, discussions and student presentations. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week. Prerequisites: One lower division course it clusters with, or instructor’s permission.

PSIA 272 Geopolitics of Asia (2, 4, 5)
The course serves as an introduction to the complex regional dynamics that make up the international relations of Asia, a region of growing political and economic importance. The course applies various analytical and theoretical approaches to understanding the complexities of the region, in its geographic, ethnic, religious and economic diversity. The course explores the role of great power hegemony and various regionalisms, and the role of Russia, China, India and the United States, and their interrelations and external relations with the region. Instructor-led class may include lectures, discussions, case studies, readings, group work. Assessment may include class participation, papers, essays, quizzes, exams, projects and presentations. Prerequisites: One lower division course it clusters with, or instructor’s permission.

PSIA 273 Geopolitics of Europe (2, 4, 5)
The course explores Europe: its contributions, its torments, its communities, its races and ethnicities, its laws, its theories, its geo-political importance to the world; investigating its many roles as colonizer, imperialist, arbiter of theology and reason, scientist, artist, musician, author, philosopher, warrior, technologist, diversifier of migration, politician, democrat, nationalist, populist, institutionalist, protectionist. The course addresses such topics as the renaissance and reformation, enlightenment and absolutism; turmoil, power, capital, revolution, collectivism vs. individualism, division and recovery, modernizer and post-modernizer, nation-state proponent, cosmopolitanism, communitarianism. Forty-five hours of instructor-led class tie. Prerequisites: One lower division course it clusters with, or instructor’s permission.